neighbourly international music
Gift from @ohooleyandtidow for @theendfestival @earlhaighall 23 Nov. #promo #proper

Gift from @ohooleyandtidow for @theendfestival @earlhaighall 23 Nov. #promo #proper

#tinyruins monday @unionchapel #bellaunion brilliant (at Union Chapel, Islington - London)

#tinyruins monday @unionchapel #bellaunion brilliant (at Union Chapel, Islington - London)

An interview with Sophie Jamieson

HI SOPHIE JAMIESON:) You will be playing at the SHHH Festival tomorrow 24th of May in Hampstead. We’re really looking forward and to this occasion we’d like to ask you some questions.

Tickets can be grabbed here: http://billetto.co.uk/shhhfestival-london

1. Where is home for you?

Home for me is a village called Datchet, in Berkshire - but to be honest it’s North/East London that feels like my real home. We’ve been gigging around that area for 2 years, my bandmates all live there and it’s where doing music generally seems to take us. Therefore it is home. 

2. What are your top three records right now?

My top three records at the moment would be:

1. Polica - Give You The Ghost

2. Broken Twin - May

3. Alice Boman - EP II

3. What will your SHHH show be like?

Our Shhh show will probably be very fitting with the festival ethic! It will be a little subdued, quite intense, but perhaps, deceivingly quiet. 

4. How do you like the idea of a festival of quiet music?

I love the idea. It is about time that someone gave us folks out there who just want to kick back and lose themselves in some gentle musical beauty, a whole day of it!! It is also very poignant I think, that this is a festival of ‘quiet’ music, rather than ‘folk’ or similar. It is very refreshing, as an artist, to be grouped not in terms of genre but in terms of atmosphere or style of performance. I think this will open some audience members’ eyes to a wider variety of genres, who may in fact have a similar ambition or focus in their music.

5. Where else should we be looking out for you?

Well, since we are taking some time off gigging over the summer to focus on writing/recording, this is one of our last London gigs for a while. We will however play a couple of festivals, including The Local’s stage at Wilderness Festival! Otherwise, you can catch us again in London in September :)

THANK YOU SOPHIE FOR THIS LOVELY INTERVIEW!:) SEE YOU TOMORROW.

THE LOCAL

O BRO @ ST GEORGES BRISTOL // THE CARRIVICK SISTERS

O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

THE CARRIVICK SISTERS | THE O BRO INTERVIEW

Identical twin sisters Charlotte and Laura Carrivick have grown up playing and writing music together. Their unique style shows their strong bluegrass influences without obscuring their English roots. With tight harmonies that only siblings can achieve, they perform their original songs on guitar, fiddle, mandolin, dobro and clawhammer banjo. 

thecarrivicksisters.co.uk

1. Where is home for you? Where are you from? 

We live in Bath at the moment, but grew up in Salcombe, South Devon. Despite Salcombe being a wonderful place to live, it’s really inconvenient when you’re constantly trying to get away for gigs as it’s so far from everywhere! Once we’d started making enough money to rent somewhere of our own, we chose Bath partly for it’s convenience to motorways, but it’s also a city full of great people and music and is very beautiful.

2. What are your top 3 movies of all time, right now? 

O Brother, Where Art Thou? (for the music, the quirky plot, and the style of humour), Cold Mountain (it’s beautifully shot, has a wonderful story line, and again, great music), Pride and Prejudice (2005 version) (like Cold Mountain, the cinematography is really beautiful, and you can’t go too wrong with Jane Austen! It has also features lurchers wandering around and long horn cattle, both of which we love.)

3. What’s your favourite Coen Brothers film? 

We’ve only seen a few, but it has to be O Brother, Where Art Thou?. The characters are brilliant and the sound track features many of our musical heroes.

4. What can we expect from your set for “O Bro”?  

We’ll be performing songs from three different Coen Brothers films (Fargo, True Grit and Intolerable Cruelty). When the songs were suggested to us we thought they sounded like really interesting ones to work on. The song from Intolerable Cruelty is one that everyone will know and not something we’d ever have considered learning had the film not popped up on the TV when we were working on this! Our version may be quite different from the original…

5. Where else should we be looking out for you? 

We have gigs all over the country throughout the year both with ‘The Carrivick Sisters’ and with our new band, ‘Cardboard Fox’.

O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

Here’s Emily Barker & The Red Clay Halo rehearsing for this friday’s show.

O BRO @ ST GEORGES BRISTOL // THOMAS TRUAX

O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

THOMAS TRUAX | THE O BRO INTERVIEW

One of the most imaginative characters on the pop music fringe, Thomas Truax (pronounced troo-aks) travels the world performing with his “band” of bizarre self-made Tim Burtonesque instruments including a motorized drum machine made of bike wheels called ‘Mother Superior’ and a pimped-up Gramophone called ‘The Hornicator’, as well as his venerable resonator guitar ‘Hank’.

thomastruax.com

1. Where is home for you? Where are you from?

I was born in Denver, Colorado, spent most of my life in New York City, but then started touring the UK and lived in London for five years. I have mostly been living in West Germany the last two years. Really home has increasingly felt more like the stage I’m playing on any given night than any particular city or country. Then there’s Wowtown, which is a town in my head that I’ve written songs and many stories about for decades.

2. What are your top 3 movies of all time, right now?

Vertigo,  Sunset Boulevard, A Bucket of Blood, Blue Velvet – oops that’s 4..! It’s hard to single out just one Hitchcock, Wilder, or Lynch, but these are all phenomenal films that I love. Then there’s something that Roger Corman does - you can almost see the enjoyment of filmmaking in the extreme economics of his films: Great, quick ideas. B-movie ideas that don’t need or want to be more than B-movie ideas. Bad takes that stayed in because there wasn’t enough film or time to do another take. I love these films because it’s almost like you get a glimpse of the individual personality and giddy excitement of the director and ideas come into being that never would have passed through the boards at big studios. It’s the kind of thing you see more often in novels and songs but it’s rare that it comes through in big studio films because there they get so filtered and honed. Too often they get all the life honed out of them.

3. What’s your favourite Coen Brothers film?

Raising Arizona. The Coen Brothers were one of the inspirations for me to go to NYU film school. Some friends and I went to see Raising Arizona at the theater. About 20 minutes before the film, I realized my wallet had been stolen. Cash, credit cards, etc all gone (except my ticket for the film which fortunately was in another pocket). I was especially angry that I was about to go see this movie, a comedy no less, and now it’d be ruined by my wretched mood over the lost wallet  I’d probably just sit there fuming, I should probably skip it and go cancel my cards and such instead. But my friends insisted I join them, and by the time the biker from hell blew up that rabbit I had pretty much forgotten my wallet and was completely engrossed in the somewhat larger problems on the screen. I’ll always remember that film for that, it had the power to lift me up and out of a horrible state of mind and laugh out loud for an hour and a half. I left the theater in a much better mood than when I’d entered. 

4. What can we expect from your set for “O Bro”?

A couple of Coen-movie derived covers with unique twists and some originals with unique twists. Mother Superior is a mechanical drum machine I built and there’ll be the Hornicator and maybe some other instruments I invented, time permitting. And my old resonator guitar Hank of course.

5. Where else should we be looking out for you?

I’m doing several other dates while in the UK during this visit: Birmingham, Liverpool, London amongst them. And I’m doing live music for a long running play at the Theater Dortmund, in Germany. Otherwise there’s lots of crazy videos on youtube.

O BRO @ ST GEORGES BRISTOL // KIRSTY McGEE

O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

KIRSTY McGEE | THE O BRO INTERVIEW

Somewhere between Jazz, Folk, Chanson and Americana there’s an area of music that doesn’t have a name. With a cartographer’s attention to detail, KIRSTY McGEE has spent the past ten years and six albums exploring and mapping this place. Honed over twenty years of following her own path, McGee’s songs show the light touch of a singer with an instinctive reflex for bringing together words and music. 

kirstymcgee.com

1. Where is home for you? Where are you from?

Currently hailing from Manchester, UK.  Originally from just outside town where I could be a country girl, I’ve become urban/tame over the last decade or so.

2. What are your top 3 movies of all time, right now?

A difficult question: I loved the film Down by Law by Jim Jarmusch - his beatnik style and the great musical score as well as the fabulous photography and dark humour are very much my thing. Three Burials (The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada) directed by and starring Tommy Lee Jones is probably one of the best films I ever saw. It stayed under my skin and is a very powerful exploration of immigration politics. For sheer indulgence I also would have to choose Breakfast at Tiffany’s just for Audrey Hepburn’s wonderful rendition of Moon River.

3. What’s your favourite Coen Brothers film?

Another difficult one. I’ve seen a lot of Coen Brothers’ films and love how intelligent and funny they are. I loved The Man Who Wasn’t There for its cool noir, and No Country for Old Men was really powerful. True Grit was also great and I don’t think I’ll ever forget the woodchipper scene in Fargo. I’m not sure I can choose a favourite - I think alongside Jarmusch, the Coens have made some of the films that have had the most resonance for me. 

4. What can we expect from your set for “O Bro”?

I’m currently making a new album called Those Old Demons, so devil blues songs are the ones I’m exploring at the moment. I’ve also recently switched from acoustic guitar to ‘Fritz’, a battered old Hoyer semi from 1962. You’ll often find me playing alongside a jazz bassist these days. It’s a real departure for me to play cover versions but I’ve chosen a few choice songs from Coen film soundtracks and am looking forward to making them my own. 

5. Where else should we be looking out for you?

I’ll be touring across the UK in the autumn. You can hear my song Sandman on Danny Boyle’s film Trance, and my new album Those Old Demons – featuring some very special guests – will be out in October. Please drop by to www.kirstymcgee.com if you’d like to know more…and if you’re active on twitter, you can find me at @hobopop.

O BRO @ ST GEORGES BRISTOL // THE PICTISH TRAIL

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O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

THE PICTISH TRAIL | THE O BRO INTERVIEW

Johnny Lynch, aka The Pictish Trail, is something of a conundrum. On first impressions, he’s a self-deprecating hairy hobo whose on-stage banter could give many comedians a run for their money. But once he begins to sing, Lynch’s extraordinary vocals reveal hidden depths that can subdue the most rowdy of audiences into a blissfully hypnotised silence.

thepictishtrail.com

1. Where is home for you? Where are you from?

Home is my rucksack at the moment, and the couch of whichever kind soul has offered to put me up.  Normally it’s my caravan on the island of Eigg, but i’m touring so much at the moment that i’m barely there. My heart is always there. And my favourite jacket, annoyingly.

2. What are your top 3 movies of all time, right now?

My top 3 fill-ums haven’t changed in the past 15 years, which probably says more about how little I watch films than anything else.  Number 1 is Fargo. Number 2 is Rushmore. Number 3 is Jaws. Or maybe Home Alone. I think it’s probably Home Alone, actually, cos i know almost all the lines to that film: “Did anyone order me a plain cheese?”  / “Oh yeah we did, but if you want any, someone’s gonna have to barf it all up, cos it’s GONE” 

Amazing.

3. What’s your favourite Coen Brothers film?

It’s Fargo. I love everything about it. The bleakness of the setting, the earnestness of the characters, the pace of the dialogue, those accents. It’s hilarious, and incredibly dark at the same time. I love how they pretended it was based on real events, when it was completely fictional. The audience is lulled in to this feeling of watching something ‘real’, and the fact they immersed it in the Mid-West somehow made it all the more authentic - and yet, really, it’s so wooden in places it’s almost pantomime. Incredibly clever. Such a great cast, too. It’s America’s best film, it sums up how dull, lifeless and normal America can be. I love it for the small things - the fact that Marge never gives birth, the leg in the woodchipper, the awkward dinner date with an old high-school class mate. It’s strangely comforting and harrowing in the same measure. A bit like Home Alone, really.

4. What can we expect from your set for “O Bro”?

Probably me doing a really bad Mid-West impersonation. Oh yah, you betcha. I’ve been asked to do a really famous song at the gig, which is always a bit daunting. I might encourage folk to sing-along, actually - so be sure and have a stiff drink beforehand, so you can pluck up the courage.

5. Where else should we be looking out for you?

I’m heading out on tour in May, and doing two shows at the Old Bookshop in Bristol, including a showcase for my record label, featuring The Pictish Trail, Tuff Love and Monoganon. Three attractive pop-rock acts, with hearts of gold. 

O BRO @ ST GEORGES BRISTOL // EMILY BARKER

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O BRO // A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF THE COEN BROTHERS

St Georges Bristol - April 25th, 2014 | Tickets £16 adv.

From inspired selections of catchy pop songs and faithful recreations of old-time country, blues and folk, to striking original scores by Carter Burwell, the movie soundtracks of Joel and Ethan Coen are as pleasurable as the films themselves, and are firm favourites amongst musicians. We have put together a bill of such artists to mix their own music in with their favourite songs from Coen Brothers films in an evening’s celebration of their work and style.

We’ve been getting together with the artists involved to find out more about them, their music, their favourite movies, and their relationship to the Coen Brothers’ work.

EMILY BARKER & THE RED CLAY HALO | THE O BRO INTERVIEW

From Western Australia, Emily Barker is a compelling songwriter with a gift for weaving melody and words. Together with her band The Red Clay Halo, she has recorded three albums, dazzled audiences at music festivals and seen her song ‘Nostalgia’ become the Bafta-winning theme tune to BBC One drama Wallander starring British actor Kenneth Branagh. 

emily-barker.com

1. Where is home for you? Where are you from?

I currently live in Stroud in Gloucestershire, UK but I’m not often there due to lots of touring, I love being itinerant. I’m from a tiny country town in the south west of Australia called Bridgetown. I grew up on a small farm by a river called The Blackwood. 

2. What are your top 3 movies of all time, right now?

Top three right now: The Proposition by John Hillcoat; Paris, Texas by Wim Wenders and Dead Man by Jim Jarmusch. I’ve been rewatching them and paying close attention to the music placement in study for a feature film I’m currently writing the music for. 

3. What’s your favourite Coen Brothers film?

It has to be “O Brother, where art thou?” for it’s absolute killer line up for musicians. Fantastic story too.

4. What can we expect from your set for “O Bro”?

Well, we’re going to do some Red Clay Halo-style interpretations of a few of the “O Bro” songs as well as one from “Inside Lleywn Davis”. I’m not sure if I’m allowed to tell you or not…so I’ll just keep it at that. We’ll mix these in between original material from our latest record ‘Dear River’ and few older faves.

5. Where else should we be looking out for you?

Look out for us on record store day as well as in the credits on a couple of films to be released later this year. Also, Germany: I’m going there loads this year to tour. 

15.05.2014 // JACK CHESHIRE + FRENCH FOR RABBITS @ EAGLE INN, SALFORD

JACK CHESHIRE + FRENCH FOR RABBITS

THE EAGLE INN, SALFORD, 19:30, THU MAY 15

£4 adv (SBTF)

JACK CHESHIRE is an English singer-songwriter & musician. His third album LONG MIND HOTEL was released in 2013 - he writes “…mildly psychedelic, quintessentially English…dreamlike & beautiful” music.

Jack was born in Bath, Somerset, and grew up surrounded by a plethora of eclectic records; Beach Boys, Augustos Pablo, Fairport Convention, Tom Waits, Billie Holiday, Laurie Anderson, Echo & the Bunnymen, Can…. A reserved songwriter but keen bass player from an early age, Jack studied and played music full-time in Liverpool for a number of formative years, developing an unusual finger-picking style on guitar as a result of bass being his first instrument.

Eventually wending his way to London, Jack self-released his debut ‘Allow It To Come On’ a lo-fi, intimate venture, recorded in the confines of a tiny attic room. It was widely lauded for its brooding, meandering melodies and minimalist production.

LONG MIND HOTEL was recorded at Sawmills Studios Cornwall. Situated up a tidal estuary, reached only by boat at high tide, it is Jack’s first studio album. The sessions spanned five days & nights last June, during a particularly cold ‘summer’ patch when it rained non-stop. Secretly glad for these conditions, Jack felt they complimented the record – you can even hear the remnants of a storm on ‘Revolving Doors’.

LONG MIND HOTEL also marks a decidedly stylistic change, due in no small part to all the other players being primarily jazz musicians.

The album owes a lot to their immense musicality. It is littered with improvised interludes, never indulgent, each song simultaneously and deliberately structured and arranged. There is an intensity to the work, possibly born of time constraints and tensions which arose, mainly around which takes to use (each one tended to differ). It lends the album great focus.

In many ways it is a ‘coming of age, a taking stock of life’s predicaments, limitations and neuroses’ album, taking in anaesthesia & a hospital stay (‘Postcard from Sedation’), unravelling the indulgences of drug taking (‘Long Mind Hotel’), social alienation (‘Into The Void’), aspiring to optimism (‘Heavenly Bodies’) and being in love (‘Moving In A Straight Line’).

http://jackcheshire.com

Hailing from New Zealand, haunting dream-folk duo FRENCH FOR RABBITS have been quietly building a reputation for their growing collection of fragile, brave songs that are spun in sea-misted lyricism. Since releasing their debut EP CLAIMED BY THE SEA in March 2012, they have gathered a dedicated fan-base around the globe with handwritten letters and home-assembled albums.

Alongside this word-of-mouth buzz for their EP and dreamy live shows they have garnered support from New Zealand alternative radio. Subsequently, the EP was nominated for BEST FOLK ALBUM OF 2013 in the New Zealand music awards. On the other side of the world, BBC 6’s GIDEON COE, TOM RAVENSCROFT and CHRIS HAWKINS; The Shed’s MARK COLES; and Amazing Radio have championed their singles, including their latest release GOAT - a song which starts out with a quiet statement of intent and swells into an anthem to stubbornness and regret.

BROOKE SINGER, who is the fragile voiced songstress and writer for the duo, began performing with guitarist JOHN FITZGERALD in 2011. Determined to overcome an acute fear of singing in public, the pair shifted to Wellington from their hometown of Christchurch and before long were playing alongside folk peers TINY RUINS, JESS CHAMBERS and DARREN HANLON, and touring nationally. In July 2013, they are travelling to the UK for the first time.

http://frenchforrabbits.com

http://thelocal.tv